THE ART OF FLOCKING: CULTURAL STEWARDSHIP IN THE PARKS

There is an art to flocking: staying close enough not to crowd each other, aligned enough to maintain a shared direction, and cohesive enough to always move towards each other.” - adrienne maree brown

The Art of Flocking: Cultural Stewardship in the Parks is a celebration of Chicago’s community-based art practice nurtured within the Chicago Park District. Hosted in partnership with the Tera Foundation for American Art, Art Design Chicago, this public programming and community exhibition series will explore the legacies of Mexican-American muralist and public artist, Hector Duarte, and Sapphire and Crystals, Chicago’s first and longest standing Black women’s artist collective.

The initiative will build on two beloved programs: ArtSeed, which engages children ages 3+ and families in 18 parks and playgrounds, and Young Cultural Stewards, a multimedia program aimed at youth ages 12-14 with hubs in each of Chicago’s three geographic regions. The Art of Flocking will engage 2,500 participants with Chicago’s community-based art history and legacy through the lens of artists whose practices are rooted in public space and community engagement.

The Art Flocking will host 216 public programs at 18 parks between June 23rd - August 3rd and a community exhibition series August 1-3rd at Willye White Park in Rogers Park, Piotrowski Park in Little Village, and Tuley Park in Chatham. The Art of Flocking will culminate in a celebration at two of the Burnham Wildlife Corridor’s Gathering Spaces: La Ronda Parakata (for which Hector Duarte was one of the lead artists) and Sankofa for the Earth (for which two members of Sapphire and Crystals, Arlene Turner Crawford and Dorian Sylvain). This event, to be held on August 11, 2018, will feature youth art and community activation.

The Art of Flocking is part of Art Design Chicago, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art exploring Chicago’s art and design legacy, with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

Photos courtesy of William Camargo